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AAS 1100 : Introduction to Asian American Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This interdisciplinary course offers an introduction to the study of Asian/Pacific Islanders in the U.S. This course will examine, through a range of disciplines (including history, literary studies, film/media, performance, anthropology, sociology), issues and methods that have emerged from Asian American Studies since its inception in the late 1960s, including the types of research questions and methods that the study of Asians & Pacific Islander peoples in the U.S. as well as politics and historical relations in the Asia/Pacific region have to offer. In this course, we will pay particular attention to the role of culture and its production in documenting histories, formulating critical practices, and galvanizing political efforts. Topics and themes include: war & empire; queer & feminist lives and histories; refugee, adoptees, transnational families, and other forms of kinship & belonging; anti-Asian violence; settler colonialism and postcolonial critique.
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AAS 2042 : Jim Crow and Exclusion Era in America
Crosslisted as: AMST 2042, HIST 2042 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar examines America during the overlapping eras of segregation & immigration exclusion.  Beginning with contests over the weaning of freedom during reconstruction and running through the institution of Jim Crow legislation and immigration exclusion, the course ends with an evaluation of mid-20th century movements for civil rights and equality.  Themes include the links between racial and economic oppression, legal and defacto restriction, everyday resistance, and struggles for equality.
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AAS 2100 : South Asian Diaspora
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2410 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This interdisciplinary course (with an emphasis in anthropology) will introduce students to the multiple routes/roots, lived experiences, and imagined worlds of South Asians who have traveled to various lands at different historical moments spanning Fiji, South Africa, Mauritius, Britain, Malaysia, United States, Trinidad, and even within South Asia itself such as the Tamil-speaking population of Sri Lanka. The course will begin with the labor migrations of the 1830s and continue up to the present period. The primary exercise will be to compare and contrast the varied expressions of the South Asian Diaspora globally in order to critically evaluate this transnational identity. Thus, we will ask what, if any, are the ties that bind a fifth-generation Indo-Trinidadian whose ancestor came to the New World as an indentured laborer or "coolie" in the mid-19th century to labor in the cane fields, to a Pakistani medical doctor who migrated to the United States in the late 1980s. If Diaspora violates a sense of identity based on territorial integrity, then could "culture" serve as the basis for a shared identity?
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AAS 2130 : Introduction to Asian American History
Crosslisted as: AMST 2640, HIST 2640 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An introductory history of Chinese, Japanese, Asian Indians, Filipinos, and Koreans in the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the 1990s. Major themes include racism and resistance, labor migration, community formation, imperialism, and struggles for equality.
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AAS 2620 : Introduction to Asian American Literature
Crosslisted as: AMST 2620, ENGL 2620 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course will introduce both a variety of writings by Asian North American authors and some critical issues concerning the production and reception of Asian American texts. Working primarily with novels, we will be asking questions about the relation between literary forms and the socio-historical context within which they take on their meanings, and about the historical formation of Asian American identities.
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AAS 2641 : Race and Modern US History
Crosslisted as: AMST 2645, ASRC 2631, HIST 2641 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course surveys modern U.S. history, from Reconstruction to the contemporary period.  It will examine how race has been the terrain on which competing ideas of the American nation have been contested.  From struggles over citizenship rights to broader meanings of national belonging, we will explore how practices, ideas, and representations have shaped political, cultural, and social power.  A key concern for this course is examining how groups and individuals have pursued racial justice from the late-nineteenth century to the present.
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AAS 2800 : Cultural Psychology
Crosslisted as: HD 2800 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course focuses on the cutting-edge research from the recently emerged, exciting field of cultural psychology. We discuss major theories and findings that integrate cultural perspectives into psychology, and consider methodological issues unique for studying the role of culture in psychological processes and functioning. Drawing on recent work in social psychology, developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, environmental psychology, and cultural anthropology, we consider a variety of topics (e.g., cognition, conceptual systems, the self, morality, emotion, epistemologies, environmental thought) from cultural perspectives.
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AAS 3020 : Asian Americans & Popular Culture
Crosslisted as: AMST 3025, PMA 3420 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course examines both mainstream representations of and independent media made by, for, and about Asians and Asian Americans throughout U.S. cultural history. In this course, we will analyze popular cultural genres & forms such as: documentary & narrative films, musical theatre & live performance revues, television, zines & blogs, YouTube/online performances, karaoke & cover performances, stand-up comedy, and popular music. Employing theories of cultural studies, media studies, and performance studies, we will discuss the cultural, discursive, and political impact of these various popular cultural forms and representations from the turn of the 20th century to the present.
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AAS 3030 : Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective
Crosslisted as: AMST 3703, ANTHR 3703, ANTHR 6703 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The common perception of ethnicity is that it is a "natural" and an inevitable consequence of cultural difference. "Asians" overseas, in particular, have won repute as a people who cling tenaciously to their culture and refuse to assimilate into their host societies and cultures. But, who are the "Asians?" On what basis can we label "Asians" an ethnic group? Although there is a significant Asian presence in the Caribbean, the category "Asian" itself does not exist in the Caribbean. What does this say about the nature of categories that label and demarcate groups of people on the basis of alleged cultural and phenotypical characteristics? This course will examine the dynamics behind group identity, namely ethnicity, by comparing and contrasting the multicultural experience of Asian populations in the Caribbean and the United States. Ethnographic case studies will focus on the East Indian and Chinese experiences in the Caribbean and the Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Filipino, and Indian experiences in the United States.
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AAS 4550 : Race and the University
Crosslisted as: AMST 4550, ENGL 4961, HIST 4551 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
What is a university, what does it do, and how does it do it? Moving out from these more general questions, this seminar will focus on a more specific set of questions concerning the place of race within the university. What kinds of knowledge are produced in the 20th- century U.S. university? Why is it, and how is it, that certain knowledge formations and disciplines come to be naturalized or privileged within the academy? How has the emergence of fields of inquiry such as Ethnic Studies (with an epistemological platform built on the articulations of race, class and gender) brought to the fore (if not brought to crisis) some of the more vexing questions that strike at the core of the idea of the university as the pre-eminent site of disinterested knowledge? This seminar will give students the opportunity to examine American higher education's (particularly its major research institutions) historical instantiation of the relations amongst knowledge, power, equality and democracy.
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AAS 4790 : Ethnicity and Identity Politics: An Anthropological Perspective
Crosslisted as: AAS 7479, ANTHR 4479, ANTHR 7479 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The most baffling aspect of ethnicity is that while ethnic sentiments and movements gain ground rapidly within the international arena, the claim that ethnicity does not exist in any objective sense is also receiving increasing credence within the academic community. How can something thought "not to exist" have such profound consequences in the real world? In lay understandings, ethnicity is believed to be a "natural" disposition of humanity. If so, why does ethnicity mean different "things" in different places? Anthropology has much to contribute to a greater understanding of this perplexing phenomenon. After all, the defining criterion for ethnic groups is that of cultural distinctiveness. Through ethnographic case studies, this course will examine some of the key anthropological approaches to ethnicity. We will explore the relationship of ethnicity to culture, ethnicity to nation, and ethnicity to state to better understand the role ethnicity plays in the identity politics of today.
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AAS 4950 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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AAS 4950 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Independent reading course in topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Students select a topic in consultation with the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the course work.
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Description
AAS 7479 : Ethnicity and Identity Politics: An Anthropological Perspective
Crosslisted as: AAS 4790, ANTHR 4479, ANTHR 7479 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The most baffling aspect of ethnicity is that while ethnic sentiments and movements gain ground rapidly within the international arena, the claim that ethnicity does not exist in any objective sense is also receiving increasing credence within the academic community. How can something thought "not to exist" have such profound consequences in the real world? In lay understandings, ethnicity is believed to be a "natural" disposition of humanity. If so, why does ethnicity mean different "things" in different places? Anthropology has much to contribute to a greater understanding of this perplexing phenomenon. After all, the defining criterion for ethnic groups is that of cultural distinctiveness. Through ethnographic case studies, this course will examine some of the key anthropological approaches to ethnicity. We will explore the relationship of ethnicity to culture, ethnicity to nation, and ethnicity to state to better understand the role ethnicity plays in the identity politics of today.
View course details
Description