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AAS 1100 : Introduction to Asian American Studies
Crosslisted as: AAS 1100, AAS 1100 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course examines the historical and contemporary issues of Asian Americans from the 1960s Civil Rights Era to the current moment of what has been termed the Post-Racial Era of the 21st century. We will analyze major themes such as race and class relations, gender and the family, immigration and globalization, religion and community activism. In the first half of this course, we will learn fundamental concepts and ideas by examining major events, including the Asian American Movement, the murder of Vincent Chin, and the LA Uprisings. In the second half of this course, we will examine how race and gender relations change alongside contemporary moments of globalization and the economy through a variety of topics including interracial marriages, refugees and welfare, the Tiger Mother, and affirmative action.
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AAS 2800 : Cultural Psychology
Crosslisted as: HD 2800 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course focuses on the cutting-edge research from the recently emerged, exciting field of cultural psychology. We discuss major theories and findings that integrate cultural perspectives into psychology, and consider methodological issues unique for studying the role of culture in psychological processes and functioning. Drawing on recent work in social psychology, developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, neuroscience, and cultural anthropology, we consicer a variety of topics (e.g., the self, motivation, morality, emotion, cognition, psychopathology, interpersonal relationships) from cultural perspectives.
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AAS 2910 : It's All Chinese to Me
Crosslisted as: AMST 2910, ENGL 2910 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
In her memoir Woman Warrior, Maxine Hong Kingston identified a conundrum familiar to many US-born children of Chinese immigrants when she asked: "What is Chinese tradition and what is the movies?" What is "Chinese tradition"? Does it mean the same thing to people in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore, or to Chinese diasporic communities in North America?  Does "Chineseness" change across time and space? While there will be occasion to discuss what "Chineseness" means in different Asian contexts, this course will focus primarily on how ideas of "China" and "Chineseness" have been historically constructed by, for, and in the West—particularly in the US. Course materials include readings on the concept of "Chineseness," Chinese American literature and film, and historical studies of East/West relations.
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AAS 3030 : Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective
Crosslisted as: AMST 3703, ANTHR 3703 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The common perception of ethnicity is that it is a "natural" and an inevitable consequence of cultural difference. "Asians" overseas, in particular, have won repute as a people who cling tenaciously to their culture and refuse to assimilate into their host societies and cultures. But, who are the "Asians?" On what basis can we label "Asians" an ethnic group? Although there is a significant Asian presence in the Caribbean, the category "Asian" itself does not exist in the Caribbean. What does this say about the nature of categories that label and demarcate groups of people on the basis of alleged cultural and phenotypical characteristics? This course will examine the dynamics behind group identity, namely ethnicity, by comparing and contrasting the multicultural experience of Asian populations in the Caribbean and the United States. Ethnographic case studies will focus on the East Indian and Chinese experiences in the Caribbean and the Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Filipino, and Indian experiences in the United States.
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AAS 3580 : Twentieth Century Women Writers of Color in the Americas
Crosslisted as: AMST 3580, ENGL 3580, FGSS 3581 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
In this course, we'll be reading literature—primarily novels—produced by hemispheric American women writers of the mid- to late twentieth-century.  We will look at how these writings articulate concerns with language, home, mobility, and memory, and at how the work is informed by the specificities of gender, race, region, and class.  Readings may include work by Leslie Marmon Silko, Sandra Cisneros, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Jamaica Kincaid, Gwendolyn Brooks, Ann Petry, Fae Myenne Ng, Carolivia Herron, Helena Maria Viramontes, and Shani Mootoo.
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AAS 4950 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor: Description